Massachusetts Legislatures Votes to Call for Amendment

Breaking news!

Massachusetts State Legislature Calls on Congress to Enact Constitutional Amendment Reversing Citizens United Decision

Massachusetts joins Rhode Island, Vermont, California, Maryland, New Mexico and Hawaii in calling for an amendment to restore democracy.

The Citizens United decision is a tremendous threat to our democracy.

The very integrity of our political system is at stake.

I am proud of the House for passing this resolution yesterday and, along with the Senate, sending a strong message that our democracy isn’t for sale.

–Rep. Cory Atkins

Continue reading

Stacie Shapiro: Thank You!

Letter to Needham Times:
Thanks to all who supported the effort to pass a resolution at Town Meeting, putting Needham on record in opposition to the Supreme Court’s “Citizens United” ruling.
This ruling, narrowly decided by a 5-4 vote, gives Corporations “Free Speech” protections under the first amendment, and thus allows corporations to engage in political expenditures in a way that was previously not permitted.
People from all political affiliations and economic standings have strongly criticized this decision, acknowledging the potential for corporate dollars to overwhelm and distort the electoral process.
 Concerns about this decision inspired a group of Needham residents to join a growing movement across the country of people seeking a Constitutional Amendment to rectify the problems associated with the Supreme Court ruling. Continue reading

Jeff Clements: We the People v. Citizens United

Citizens United is catastrophic in itself but the problem runs deeper.

Citizens United is the most extreme extension of a concerted, well-funded campaign for “corporate rights” that has been building for decades.

With increasing aggressiveness, corporations have persuaded activist courts to rewrite the First Amendment to include “corporate speech,” not just human speech. Corporations now use this twisted theory to demolish public laws that stand in the path of corporate profit.

–Jeff Clements Continue reading

Needham’s U.S. Congressman Stephen Lynch (MA-09)

I support a Constitutional amendment to overturn the Citizens United decision.

Corporations are state-created entities that are immortal —
they live forever

—granting them rights due to citizens greatly diminishes the rights of ordinary citizens [flesh and blood persons].

It was wrong-headed. I think it was probably

the worst decision  of the Supreme Court in my lifetime.”

–U.S. Congressman Stephen Lynch (Oct. 24, 2011, at Needham Public Library)

(Congressman Lynch is Needham’s Representative in US House of Representatives)

‘We the People’ can Overturn ‘Citizens United’

There are only two ways a Supreme Court ruling can be overturned.  The court can do so in a new case, or the people can do so by ratifying a Constitutional amendment, as we have done at least six times before.

Given the corporate-friendly approach of the current Roberts court, we cannot wait for the Supreme Court to correct Citizens United.

–Jeff Clements and Rep. Jim McGovern, in the Boston Globe, January, 2012

April 11: Boston College Law – Forum on Citizens United (in Jamaica Plain)

Citizens United Forum Presented by Students of Boston College Law School

A collaborative of Boston College graduate students will be hosting a panel on the subject of Citizens United and campaign finance reform in Jamaica Plain on April 11 at 7pm.

Panelists will include State Senator Jamie Eldridge (D-Acton), President of the New England Legal Foundation Martin Newhouse, constitutional law scholar Professor Lawrence Friedman and WGBH journalist and former Washington Post reporter Ibby Caputo.

Admission to the forum is free and residents of Boston and the surrounding communities are encouraged to attend and learn the reasoning behind this important Supreme Court decision and the rationale of the opposition.

“People should care about the Citizens United decision because it is having an effect on the way democracy is practiced in this country, about the way elections work and who gets elected and why,”

said Professor Lawrence Friedman, a professor of Constitutional Law at New England Law | Boston and a panelist for the forum. Continue reading